Shown My New Head in a Mirror

Shown My New Head in a Mirror

At the end of a very long day, I am shown my new head in a mirror. My once expansive temples have been covered in a sea of white and purple dots. For the next five days, I cannot wash the top of my head, and it must be sprayed with saline solution every 20 minutes, and as often as can be tolerated during the night. I also have to take antibiotics. In these crucial days, the new follicles are desperately seeking to ‘vascularise’, to reattach themselves to the body’s blood supply. By day four, the front of my head is still a white, purplish mess, a carpet of tiny, entirely painless little scabs. But on day five, the shampooing begins. Lather the front, leave to soak, apply the most delicate of strokes and the near microscopic little scabs gradually flake away. On day six, something magic happens. There are actual tiny little bristles. Hundreds of them. Thousands. My great worry had been the prospect of a large swathe of skinhead-style stubble seeming to emerge from underneath my normal, fairly short hair, giving me the appearance of some kind of National Front werewolf, but my concerns were misplaced. Baldness cure sends men flocking to Turkey A growing number of men from Arab countries and Europe are asking doctors in Turkey to fill out thin beards, moustaches and main hair with transplants. Selahattin Tulunay, a Turkish plastic surgeon, says about 50 Arabs seeking hair treatment arrive in Istanbul every day. ISTANBUL // Tarik travelled to Istanbul from his home in Abu Dhabi to solve a very personal problem. The 28-year-old asked a doctor in Istanbul to restore his main hair that had become thin because of premature hair loss. “In one or two months from now, there will be no problem anymore,” Tarik said after receiving a hair transplant in Istanbul this month. “The operation took three days, but I am very happy with the result,” he added, sounding jubilant. Tarik is not alone. A growing number of men from Arab countries as well as from Europe are asking doctors in Turkey to fill out thin beards, moustaches and main hair with transplants. Turkey’s thriving health tourism industry offers a combination of high-quality treatment, reasonable prices and the attraction of a popular tourist destination, doctors and patients say. Irfan Atik, a Turkish tour operator who specialises in arranging visits by patients from abroad for hair transplants in Turkey and who brought Tarik to Istanbul, said many Arabs preferred Turkey because the country did not feel foreign to them. At the end of a very long day, I am shown my new head in a mirror. My once expansive temples have been covered in a sea of white and purple dots. For the next five days, I cannot wash the top of my head, and it must be sprayed with saline solution every 20 minutes, and as often as can be tolerated during the night. I also have to take antibiotics. In these crucial days, the new follicles are desperately seeking to ‘vascularise’, to reattach themselves to the body’s blood supply. By day four, the front of my head is still a white, purplish mess, a carpet of tiny, entirely painless little scabs. But on day five, the shampooing begins. Lather the front, leave to soak, apply the most delicate of strokes and the near microscopic little scabs gradually flake away. On day six, something magic happens. There are actual tiny little bristles. Hundreds of them. Thousands. My great worry had been the prospect of a large swathe of skinhead-style stubble seeming to emerge from underneath my normal, fairly short hair, giving me the appearance of some kind of National Front werewolf, but my concerns were misplaced.

Baldness cure sends men flocking to Turkey A growing number of men from Arab countries and Europe are asking doctors in Turkey to fill out thin beards, moustaches and main hair with transplants. Selahattin Tulunay, a Turkish plastic surgeon, says about 50 Arabs seeking hair treatment arrive in Istanbul every day. ISTANBUL // Tarik travelled to Istanbul from his home in Abu Dhabi to solve a very personal problem. The 28-year-old asked a doctor in Istanbul to restore his main hair that had become thin because of premature hair loss. “In one or two months from now, there will be no problem anymore,” Tarik said after receiving a hair transplant in Istanbul this month. “The operation took three days, but I am very happy with the result,” he added, sounding jubilant. Tarik is not alone. A growing number of men from Arab countries as well as from Europe are asking doctors in Turkey to fill out thin beards, moustaches and main hair with transplants. Turkey’s thriving health tourism industry offers a combination of high-quality treatment, reasonable prices and the attraction of a popular tourist destination, doctors and patients say. Irfan Atik, a Turkish tour operator who specialises in arranging visits by patients from abroad for hair transplants in Turkey and who brought Tarik to Istanbul, said many Arabs preferred Turkey because the country did not feel foreign to them.

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