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From left: Latisse, Rogaine’s new 5 percent minoxidil formulation for women, and Pantene Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women.

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From left: Latisse, Rogaine’s new 5 percent minoxidil formulation for women, and Pantene Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women.

But in November, after 10 years of research, Rogaine introduced a new 5 percent minoxidil formulation for women. It’s a mousse (instead of a liquid) that needs to be applied only once a day instead of twice, which means that it can be more easily incorporated into a woman’s evening skin-care routine. Teal replaces the blue and silver palette of the men’s Rogaine, and the packaging bears a lotus flower. (Also last year, Pantene introduced its Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women, which is 2 percent minoxidil.)

Angela Ledford, 34, a beauty blogger, had used the Rogaine men’s formulation, after hair extensions, M.A.C. Black Carbon eye shadow, Joan Rivers hair fill-in powder and supplements all failed to hide her thinning jet-black hair. (The men’s product was not F.D.A.-approved for women, but that didn’t stop women from buying it.)

“I’m not worried I’m going to sprout a mustache anymore,” Ms. Ledford said of her switch to the women’s product, which doesn’t drip down the face. Recently she watched a video blog of herself in which she looked down and was pleased to note baby hairs sprouting “all over my scalp,” she said.

Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic, said that Rogaine works better on the top and crown (for reasons not fully understood, the frontal hairline tends to be more resistant to treatment) and ideally should be started as soon as women notice thinning. “Any regrowth you get is a minimal amount,” Dr. Piliang said. “So the more density when you start, the better results you get.”

Latisse, a prescription medication used since 2008 to grow longer, fuller eyelashes, is now being tested for the scalp. (Doctors report that patients have tried it on their own, but a limiting factor is that Latisse comes in a very small bottle; it doesn’t go very far.)

Dr. Piliang said she expects Latisse’s results to be less striking on the head than on the lashes because the drug works by shifting more hair from the resting phase to the growing phase. For lashes, only about 30 percent of the hair is in the growing phase at any given time, she said, but on the scalp, that figure is 80 or 90 percent.

Some treatments in development hold particular promise for women. Angela Christiano, a hair geneticist and Columbia University professor of dermatology, is hoping to begin clinical trials in a year or two on a procedure in which she dissects hair-follicle stem cells, grows them in the lab until she has several million, then injects them into the scalp, where, a very small study done with a human skin model has shown, they induce new hairs.

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